Alexander Watson Cinkaj; 1993-2016

Alex was my only child. He was shy and sweet. He loved animals, was kind, and only wanted to be loved. Alex loved movies, we watched the same ones over and over. (Dodgeball, Stepbrothers, Star Wars, Hunger Games- to name a few). He loved music. I have fond memories of sharing a pair of earbuds with him (each of us with one in our ear) and walking and singing out loud. 

He loved the beach. We vacationed there every year and spent many hours digging holes in the sand, jumping waves, and playing catch with a nerf football on the beach. We climbed many lighthouses together.

We’d laugh at something funny and then laugh at each other laughing, which would then make us laugh even more, which would then have us in stitches with tears running down our faces and holding our sides.

Alex was incredibly kind. He would literally give you the shirt off his back. When he was 18 he was bussing tables at a local restaurant. A young girl was there having dinner outside with her family. The air had taken on an unexpected chill, the girl was cold and her family asked if the restaurant had any t-shirts or sweatshirts for sale. Alex told them they did not but then ran out to his car and got his own hoodie which he brought back and gave to the girl. The family gave him a $10 tip – Alex was so surprised because to him he was just doing what he thought was right (to help the person) and had never even had a thought of anything more to it than that. 

Alex was smart; always did well in school. His depression and anxiety came on in his sophomore year in college. Even though he was struggling greatly he graduated from college a semester early with a degree in Energy, Business & Finance and a minor in Economics. The pressure to succeed and keep up with what he thought everyone else was doing became too much for him and at the very young age of 23, he left this world. I share his story with everyone. I truly believe we need to destigmatize suicide and normalize talking about mental health. Alex fought hard to overcome his illness and I tried so hard to help him. I don’t want anyone to ever go through what Alex did – I don’t want anyone to ever feel as if they don’t matter and that they would not be missed. I don’t want any other parent to have to endure what it is like to lose a child.

Alex was a kind and beautiful soul. He should be here now living out his dreams.”